Feb 2018

Systematic review and meta-analysis of cannabinoids in palliative medicine

Mücke, M., Weier, M., Carter, C., Copeland, J., Degenhardt, L., Cuhls, H., Radbruch, L., Häuser W., Conrad,R. (2018). Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle, doi: 10.1002/jcsm.12273.

A systematic review and meta-analysis on the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of cannabinoids in palliative medicine across nine studies with a total of 1561 participants.

In cancer patients, there were no significant differences between cannabinoids and placebo for improving caloric intake (standardised mean differences [SMD]: 0.2 95% confidence interval [CI]: [−0.66, 1.06] P = 0.65), appetite (SMD: 0.81 95% CI: [−1.14, 2.75]; P = 0.42), nausea/vomiting (SMD: 0.21 [−0.10, 0.52] P = 0.19), >30% decrease in pain (risk differences [RD]: 0.07 95% CI: [−0.01, 0.16]; P = 0.07), or sleep problems (SMD: −0.09 95% CI: [−0.62, 0.43] P = 0.72).

In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients, cannabinoids were superior to placebo for weight gain (SMD: 0.57 [0.22; 0.92]; P = 0.001) and appetite (SMD: 0.57 [0.11; 1.03]; P = 0.02) but not for nausea/vomiting (SMD: 0.20 [−0.15, 0.54]; P = 0.26).

Regarding side effects in cancer patients, there were no differences between cannabinoids and placebo in symptoms of dizziness (RD: 0.03 [−0.02; 0.08]; P = 0.23) or poor mental health (RD: −0.01 [−0.04; 0.03]; P = 0.69), whereas in HIV patients, there was a significant increase in mental health symptoms (RD: 0.05 [0.00; 0.11]; P = 0.05).

Mar 2018

Review synthesises findings from high quality systematic reviews

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Mar 2018

Study assessing the efficacy and safety of cannabidiol as an add-on anticonvulsant

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